Course Information

for Health and Biomedical Sciences Department


Introduction to Anatomy and Physiology (BIOL091)

Credits:3

This course is a study of the human body, its structure and functions, with an introduction of its relationship to disease. Not for College credit. Pass/No Pass (Fall, Spring)

Lower Division Biology Equivalent (BIOL100EQ)

Credits:3

Anatomy and Physiology I (BIOL101)

Credits:3

This course is the first trimester of a two-trimester course. BIOL101 is a study of the skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems of the human body, along with their cytology, histology, and chemistry. Three hours of lecture each week. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

Anatomy and Physiology I and Lab (BIOL101C)

Credits:4

This course is the first of a two-trimester course. It focuses on the study of the typical structure and function of the human body utilizing digital and electronic media. It includes a study of the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems, along with their cytology, histology, and chemistry. Lab exercises are included in this course; therefore, a lab kit and webcam are required. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

Anatomy and Physiology I Lab (BIOL101L)

Credits:1

This laboratory course is the first trimester of a two-trimester course. The laboratory course is the study of the anatomy of the skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems of the human body using plastic models. Two hours of lab each week. A lab fee will be assessed. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

Anatomy and Physiology II (BIOL102)

Credits:3

This course is the second trimester of a two-trimester course. BIOL102 is a study if the endocrine, circulatory, lymphatic, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems of the human body. Three hours of lecture each week. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

Anatomy and Physiology II and Lab (BIOL102C)

Credits:4

This course is the second of a two-trimester course. It includes further study of the typical structure and function of the human body utilizing digital and electronic media. The course covers endocrine, circulatory, lymphatic, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems. Lab exercises are included in this course; therefore, a lab kit and webcam are required. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

Anatomy and Physiology II Lab (BIOL102L)

Credits:1

This laboratory course is the second trimester of a two-trimester course. The laboratory course include the a study of the anatomy of the endocrine, circulatory, lymphatic, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems of the human body using plastic models. Two hours of lab each week. A lab fee will be assessed. (Fall, spring, summer)

Biological Concepts (BIOL103)

Credits:3

This course is designed for health science majors, and does not meet the requirements for a major in biomedical sciences. It is therefore not to be considered as a prerequisite biology course for professional programs, including but not limited to, medical or dental school, physical therapy, physician's assistant, optometry, veterinary school, or graduate school in the biological sciences. In this course, the student will explore unifying biological concepts, such as cells, growth, reproduction, metabolism, cell division, ecosystem processes, and other fundamental life processes. Three hours of lecture each week. (Fall)

Biological Concepts Lab (BIOL103L)

Credits:1

This course is a lab which accompanies the study of the characteristics of living organisms in BIOL 103. Cell structure, cell growth, metabolism, morphology, and other fundamental life processes will be investigated. Two hours of lab each week. This lab is designed for non-science majors and does not meet the requirement for a major or minor in biology. A lab fee will be assessed. (Fall)

Concepts of Pathophysiology (BIOL125)

Credits:3

This course is an introduction to a study of the anatomical and physiological functions of the human body. It explores the accompanying biologic, immunological, genetic, and physical manifestations of diseases. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

Sectional Anatomy (BIOL144)

Credits:3

This course is a study of human anatomy, primarily emphasizing axial planes, but also including sagittal, coronal, and oblique planes. It is designed to aid imaging modality students in recognizing, locating, and identifying normal anatomy on various computer images. Two hours of lecture each week. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

Sectional Anatomy (BIOL144C)

Credits:3

This course is a study of human anatomy, primarily emphasizing axial planes, but also including sagittal, coronal, and oblique planes. It is designed to aid imaging modality students in recognizing, locating, and identifying normal anatomy on various computer images. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

Sectional Anatomy Lab (BIOL144L)

Credits:0

This course is a lab which accompanies BIOL 144 and includes the observation of the human anatomy, emphasizing axial planes and including sagittal, coronal, and oblique planes. It is designed to aid imaging modality students in recognizing, locating, and identifying normal anatomy on various computer images. Two hours of lab each week. A lab fee will be assessed. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

General Biology I (BIOL151)

Credits:3

This course is the first trimester of a two-trimester course. It surveys methods and concepts in biology, cellular biology, including biomolecular functions, metabolic pathways, principles of inheritance, along with diversity of microbiota and macrobiota. Three hours of lecture each week. This course satisfies the requirement for a major or minor in biology. (Fall)

General Biology Lab (BIOL151L)

Credits:1

This course includes lab exercises to accompany the didactic material covered in BIOL 151, including biomolecular functions, metabolic pathways, and diversity of microbiota and macrobiota. Three hours of lab each week. This course satisfies the requirement for a major or minor in biology. A lab fee will be assessed. (Fall)

General Biology II (BIOL152)

Credits:3

This course surveys plant structure and function with an in-depth study into animal structure and function, including ecology and behavior. Three hours of lecture each week. This course satisfies the requirement for a major or minor in biology. (Spring)

General Biology II Lab (BIOL152L)

Credits:1

This course includes lab exercises which accompany the survey of plant structure and function with an in-depth study into animal structure and function. Three hours of lab each week. This course satisfies the requirement for a major or minor in biology. A lab fee will be assessed. (Spring)

Directed Study in Biology (BIOL159)

Credits:1

This course provides the student with the opportunity for directed study of a particular problem or area.

Kinesiology (BIOL201)

Credits:3

This is an introductory course in the study of human movement and exercise. Topics will include the biomechanics, physiological, and neurological foundations of movement in the context of activity.

Principles of Microbiology (BIOL225)

Credits:3

This course is the study of the principles of microbiology, disinfection, sterilization, elementary immunology and microorganisms, emphasizing their relationship to health and disease. Three hours of lecture each week. This course does not satisfy the requirement for a major or minor in biology. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

Principles of Microbiology (BIOL225C)

Credits:4

This course includes a study of the principles of microbiology, disinfection, sterilization, elementary immunology and microorganisms, emphasizing their relationship to health and disease. Three hours of lecture each week. This course does not satisfy the requirement for a major or minor in biology. This course has a lab component; therefore, a lab kit and webcam are required. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

Principles of Microbiology Lab (BIOL225L)

Credits:1

This course includes lab exercises which accompany the lecture portion of the course, including disinfection, sterilization, and the culture and identification of microorganisms. Three hours of lab each week. This course does not satisfy the requirement for a major or minor in biology. A lab fee will be assessed. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

Topics in Biology (BIOL255)

Credits:1

This course includes various topics in the areas of science and will be offered as needs and interests arise.

Topics in Biology (BIOL255(2))

Credits:2

Various topics in the areas of science will be offered as needs and interests arise.

Topics in Biology (BIOL255(3))

Credits:3

Various topics in the areas of science will be offered as needs and interests arise.

Exercise Physiology (BIOL301)

Credits:3

This course reviews the muscle cell anatomy and physiology and examines the physiologic responses to various types of exercise (endurance, strengthening) and the systems involved (musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, pulmonary, renal, endocrine, metabolic). The thermoregulatory system and the effects on the environment, as well as the physiological responses based on the influence of age, genetics, and culture on resting measurements and responses to activity are also examined. Adaptations to regular exercise of various types and to diminished activity as well as the effect of nutritional intake are studied. Basic principles of exercise testing, assessment and interpretation of measurements of body composition, and exercise prescription to improve cardiovascular fitness are also discussed. Spring, Summer.

General Microbiology (BIOL330)

Credits:3

This course is a study of the morphology, physiology, genetics, symbiotic relationships, and methods of control of bacteria, yeasts, molds, viruses, and some protozoa. Topics also include host immune responses, environmental applications of microorganisms, and genetic engineering technology. Three hours of lecture each week. This course satisfies the requirement for a major or minor in biology. (Fall, Spring)

General Microbiology Lab (BIOL330L)

Credits:1

This course includes lab exercises which accompany the lecture portion of the course. The course includes the study of the morphology, biochemical reactions, and methods of control of bacteria, yeasts, molds, viruses, and some protozoa. Other exercises include the disinfection, sterilization, and the culture and identification of microorganisms, and genetic engineering technology. Three hours of lab each week. This course satisfies the requirement for a major or minor in biology. A lab fee will be assessed. (Fall)

Genetics (BIOL345)

Credits:3

This course is a study of the principles of inheritance in all living organisms and an investigation of gene structure and function. Topics will include classical (Mendelian), molecular, and non-Mendelian genetics. Basic principles of genetic engineering will be addressed. Three hours of lecture each week. This course satisfies the requirement for a major or minor in biology. (Spring)

Genetics Lab (BIOL345L)

Credits:1

This course focuses on experiments to study the principles of inheritance in all living organisms and an investigation of gene structure and function. Topics will include classical (Mendelian), molecular, and non-Mendelian genetics and principles of genetic engineering. Three hours of lab each week. This course satisfies the requirement for a major or minor in biology. A lab fee will be assessed. (Spring)

Cell Biology (BIOL360)

Credits:3

This course is an in-depth study of the molecular biology of the cell. Topics covered include cell structure and function, biomembrane structure, transmembrane transport, intra- and extracellular trafficking, signal transduction pathways, cell motility, cell cycle regulation, developmental cell biology, immunity, and cancer cell biology.

Histology (BIOL410)

Credits:3

This course is a study of the cellular anatomy and function of normal human tissues and organs. Topics covered include cellular structure and function, basic tissue types, and the functional microanatomy of the various human organ systems.

Histology Lab (BIOL410L)

Credits:1

This course focuses on laboratory exercises to accompany BIOL410. The primary focus will be on the visual identification of human cells, tissues, and related structures.

Topics in Biology (BIOL459)

Credits:1

This course includes various topics in the area of biology and will be offered as needs and interests arise.

Topics in Biology (BIOL459(2))

Credits:2

Various topics in the area of biology will be offered as needs and intersts arise.

Topics in Biology (BIOL459(3))

Credits:3

Various topics in the area of biology will be offered as needs and interests arise.

Issues in Science and Religion (BIOL475)

Credits:3

This course is designed to help students develop an understanding of the issues raised by the interaction between modern science and present-day Christian thought. A brief historical overview of the conflict between science and religion is followed by an assessment of the contemporary state of the dialogue in such areas as cosmology and the origins of the universe, origins of life, the theory of Darwinian evolution, and the design argument. (Spring)

Gross Musculoskeletal Anatomy for the OT (BIOL515)

Credits:4

This course focuses on the macroscopic structures related to the muscular and skeletal systems of the body. Students will participate in human cadaver labs in order to integrate knowledge of the body into concepts of occupational therapy practice.

Gross Musculoskeletal Anatomy for the OT Lab (BIOL515L)

Credits:0

Advanced Anatomy and Physiology (BIOL521)

Credits:3

This course includes advanced studies of human anatomy and physiology of the cell and muscular, cardiovascular, pulmonary, neurological, renal, hepatic, and endocrine systems. Emphasis is placed on feedback mechanisms, homeostasis, assessment, and intervention. This serves as a basis for understanding pathophysiology of these systems and associated anesthesia implications.

Advanced Pathophysiology (BIOL522)

Credits:3

This course examines advanced human pathophysiology of the cell and muscle, cardiovascular, pulmonary, neurological, renal, hepatic, immune, hematological, musculoskeletal, gastrointestinal, and endocrine systems. Mechanisms of disease-state manifestations at the cellular, organ, and system levels are explored. Anesthetic implications are highlighted.

Gross Anatomy (BIOL715C)

Credits:5

This course examines gross human anatomical structure and function with emphasis on the musculoskeletal, circulatory, and peripheral nervous systems. Laboratory includes cadaver dissection, prosected material, and paper and anatomical models to facilitate the integration of knowledge of the body into concepts of physical therapy practice. Clinical correlation is also emphasized through the use of case studies. Diagnostic images are introduced for selected anatomical regions.

Pharmacology (BIOL823)

Credits:1

This course introduces contemporary pharmacology, including an overview of basic pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic principles with special emphasis on the influence of medications on function and rehabilitation. The physical therapists role in recognition of adverse effects or interactions of pharmacological substances is emphasized.

BSHS Track II A.S. Level Program Coursework (BSHSAS)

Credits:0

Principles of Chemistry (CHEM101)

Credits:3

An introduction to the fundamental principles of inorganic, organic, and biochemistry. Topics covered will include atomic and molecular structure; chemical bonding; stoichiometry; states of matter; chemical kinetics; acid-base equilibria; hydrocarbons; carbohydrates, lipids, and proteins; and biochemical processes with emphasis on the application of chemistry to everyday life. This course is designed for non-science majors, does not satisfy the requirement for a major or minor in chemistry, and cannot be used as a prerequisite for any other chemistry course. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

Survey of Inorganic Chemistry (CHEM111)

Credits:3

This course is an introduction to the fundamental principles of inorganic chemistry. Topics covered will include atomic and molecular structure; chemical bonding; stoichiometry; states of matter; chemical kinetics and acid-base equilibrium; acid-base equilibria and nuclear chemistry, with an emphasis on the application of chemistry to everyday life. The course is designed for non-science majors, does not satisfy the requirement for a major or minor in chemistry, and cannot be used as a prerequisite for any other chemistry course. (Fall, Spring)

Survey of Organic and Biochemistry (CHEM112)

Credits:3

This course is an introduction to the fundamental principles of organic and biochemistry. Topics covered will include structure, properties and reactivity to the major classes of organic and bimolecular compounds, with particular reference to hydrocarbons, aromatic hydrocarbons, organic compounds containing oxygen and nitrogen, carbohydrates, lipids, proteins and biochemical processes. A review of the application of these compounds in the chemistry of everyday life will be emphasized. This course is designed for non-science majors, does not satisfy the requirement for a major or minor in chemistry, and cannot be used as a prerequisite for any other chemistry course. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

Survey of General Chemistry Lab (CHEM113L)

Credits:1

This course is an integrated laboratory course designed to illustrate the concepts of chemistry taught in CHEM111 and CHEM112. Three hours of lab per week. A lab fee will be assessed. This course does not satisfy the requirement for a major or minor in chemistry. (Spring, Summer)

General Chemistry I (CHEM151)

Credits:3

This course is the first trimester of a two-trimester course. Topics include nature of matter, electronic structure, chemical reactions, stoichiometry, thermochemistry, chemical bonding, molecular structures, and properties of solutions and gases. Three hours of lecture and one hour of recitation each week. This course satisfies the requirement for a major or minor in chemistry. (Fall, Spring)

General Chemistry I Lab (CHEM151L)

Credits:1

This course is the lab portion of the first trimester of a two-trimester course. This course includes laboratory exercises and the lecture portion of CHEM151. Three hours of lab each week. This course satisfies the requirement for a major or minor in chemistry. A lab fee will be assessed. (Fall, Spring)

General Chemistry II (CHEM152)

Credits:3

This course is a continuation of CHEM 151. Topics include chemical equilibrium, acid-base theory and equilibria, solubility and complex ion equilibria, thermodynamics and equilibrium, electrochemistry, nuclear chemistry, and chemical families. Three hours of lecture and one hour of recitation each week. This course satisfies the requirement for a major or minor in chemistry. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

General Chemistry II Lab (CHEM152L)

Credits:1

This course is a continuation of CHEM151L. The course includes laboratory exercises that illustrate the principles covered in the lecture portion of CHEM152. Three hours of lab each week. This course satisfies the requirement for a major or minor in chemistry. A lab fee will be assessed. (Fall,Spring,Summer)

Directed Study in Chemistry (CHEM159)

Credits:1

This course provides the student with the opportunity for directed study of a particular problem or area.

Organic Chemistry I (CHEM311)

Credits:3

This course is the first trimester of a two-trimester course. It is a study of the structure and reactions of organic compounds with emphasis on nomenclature, molecular structure, reaction mechanisms, stereochemical properties, organic syntheses, electronic effects, and spectra-structure relationships. Three hours of lecture and one hour of recitation each week. This course satisfies the requirement for a major or minor in chemistry. (Fall, Spring)

Organic Chemistry I Lab (CHEM311L)

Credits:1

This course is the lab portion of the first trimester of a two-trimester course. The course includes laboratory exercises that illustrate the principles covered in the lecture portion of CHEM311. Three hours of lab each week. This course satisfies the requirement for a major or minor in chemistry. A lab fee will be assessed. (Fall, Spring)

Organic Chemistry II (CHEM312)

Credits:3

This course is a continuation of CHEM 311. Three hours of lecture and one hour of recitation each week. This course satisfies the requirement for a major or minor in chemistry. (Spring, Summer)

Organic Chemistry II Lab (CHEM312L)

Credits:1

This course is a continuation of CHEM 311L. The course includes laboratory exercises that illustrate the principles covered in the lecture portion of CHEM312. Three hours of lab each week. This course satisfies the requirement for a major or minor in chemistry. A lab fee will be assessed. (Spring, Summer)

Biochemistry I (CHEM411)

Credits:4

This course is a study of the fundamental principles of the chemistry of living organisms. Structures, properties, and functions of biomolecules, including amino acids, proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, nucleotides, nucleic acids, and biological membranes; and enzymatic catalysis and mechanisms, enzyme kinetics, and central pathways of metabolism will be studied. This course satisfies the requirement for a major or minor in chemistry. (Fall)

Biochemistry II (CHEM412)

Credits:3

This course is a continued study of the fundamental principles of the chemistry of living organisms. Included are bioenergetics and metabolism of proteins and nucleic acids, regulation of gene expression and signal transduction pathways, hormones and the study of neurotransmitters, acetylcholine, catecholamines, serotonin, and gamma-aminobutyric acid. This course satisfies the requirement for a major or minor in chemistry. (Spring)

Biochemistry Lab (CHEM413L)

Credits:1

This course is an introduction to the quantitative and qualitative methods of isolation, purification, and identification of biological materials, including organelle separation, electrophoresis, and the effects of hormones on macromolecular synthesis. This course satisfies the requirement for a major or minor in chemistry. A lab fee will be assessed. (Spring)

Topics in Chemistry (CHEM459)

Credits:1

This course focuses on various topics in the area of chemistry and will be offered as needs and interests arise.

Topics in Chemistry (CHEM459(4))

Credits:4

Introduction to Community Healthcare Interdisciplinary Partnering (CHIP220)

Credits:2

This course introduces the student to the concept of partnering with patients and the healthcare team to support maximum effectiveness toward best health practices for the patient. The course will cover basic skills such as observational skill development, elementary patient care management and effective interaction with the healthcare team.

Introduction to Practice (CHTC340)

Credits:4

This course introduces the student to the concept of partnering with patients and the healthcare team to support maximum effectiveness toward best health practices for the patient. The course will cover basic skills such as observational skill development, elementary patient care management, and effective interaction with the healthcare team. The course also includes a study of key issues concerning community health care aimed at developing practical approaches to supporting patients. Students consider obstacles to effective health care as well as strategies for enabling at-risk patients to play a more active role in promoting their health and well-being. This course provides students with the academic foundation for subsequent CHTC Internship(s) with Florida Hospital.

CHTC Internship I (CHTC350)

Credits:2

An internship in interdisciplinary care with Florida Hospital (FH). Using the academic and practical foundation provided in CHTC 320, interns serve alongside multidisciplinary clinical teams in a variety of settings. Interns will participate in weekly meetings with FH healthcare teams, further exploring the philosophy of health care delivery that encourages providers and care teams to meet patients where they are, from the simplest to the most complex conditions. Students will acquire 70-140 contact hours.

CHTC Internship II (CHTC360)

Credits:2

An internship in interdisciplinary care with Florida Hospital (FH). Using the academic and practical foundation provided in CHTC 320, interns serve alongside multidisciplinary clinical teams in a variety of settings. Interns will participate in weekly meetings with FH healthcare teams, further exploring the philosophy of health care delivery that encourages providers and care teams to meet patients where they are, from the simplest to the most complex conditions. Students will acquire 70-140 contact hours.

Lower Division Computer Equivalent (CPTR100EQ)

Credits:0

Introduction to Microcomputer Basic Applications (CPTR103)

Credits:2

This course covers computer applications using PCs. The course includes an introduction to hardware, software, the Internet and word-processing applications. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

Introduction to Microcomputers (CPTR105)

Credits:3

This course covers computer applications using PCs. The course combines the content of CPTR 103 with spreadsheet and presentation applications. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

Directed Study in Microcomputers (CPTR159)

Credits:1

This course provides the student with the opportunity for directed study of a particular problem or area.

Directed Study in Computers (CPTR159(2))

Credits:2

Intermediate Excel (CPTR205)

Credits:2

This course provides students hands-on training using the spreadsheet application MS Excel. Students will gain an in-depth understanding of working with spreadsheet data in ranges, functions, and charts. This course includes the application of custom formatting, audit worksheets, the use of macros, templates, multiple workbooks, and importing/exporting data. Also included in this course are data base features to extract and filter data, use data analysis, pivot tables, data validation, and data protection.

Lower Division Elective Equivalent (ELEC101EL)

Credits:3

Lower Division Elective Equivalent (ELEC103EL)

Credits:3

Lower Division Elective Equivalent (ELEC104EL)

Credits:3

Lower Division Elective Equivalent (ELEC105EL)

Credits:3

Lower Division Elective Equivalent (ELEC106EL)

Credits:0

English Review (ENGL091)

Credits:3

This course is designed for those students whose English ACT score is below 19, or whose Critical Reading SAT scores are below 470, or who do not pass the English Composition Placement Test. The course focuses on the basic steps in the writing process. Emphasis is on developing the writing and grammar skills necessary for successful entry into ENGL 101. Students must earn a minimum grade of "C" (2.00) to progress into ENGL 101. Not for University credit. (Pass/No Pass) (Fall, Spring, Summer)

English Composition I (ENGL101)

Credits:3

This course focuses on writing as a means for authentic expression and exploration. Emphasis is on the writing process, especially revision. Students write several expository essays organized according to prescribed modes and learn specific writing skills and principles which readily apply to most writing tasks. The course meets the requirement for a written communication course (see the Communication Requirements section in the Academic Catalog). (Fall, Spring, Summer)

English Composition II (ENGL102)

Credits:3

This course applies the writing skills developed in ENGL 101 while focusing on rhetorical and reasoning skills necessary for various persuasive and research writing activities. Students write several persuasive papers and a major research paper. The course meets the requirement for a written communication course (see the Communication Requirements section in the Academic Catalog). (Fall, Spring, Summer)

Medical Terminology (ENGL144)

Credits:2

This course provides a development of a medical vocabulary, including spelling, abbreviations, and the general use of medical terms. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

Directed Study (ENGL159)

Credits:1

This course provides the student with the opportunity for directed study of a particular problem or area.

Directed Study in English (ENGL159(3))

Credits:3

Survey of American Literature (ENGL214)

Credits:3

This course is a study of representative selections from major American writers with an emphasis on ideas, trends, and attitudes having universal interest and value. Genres include poetry, short stories, drama, the novel, and the essay. (Spring)

Technical Writing (ENGL250)

Credits:3

This course focuses on techniques of written communication within a professional setting. It includes writing reports, proposals, case notes, and charts. The course meets the requirement for a written communications course (see the Communication Requirements section in the Academic Catalog). (Spring)

Topics in English (ENGL255)

Credits:1

This course focuses on various topics in the areas of language arts and will be offered as needs and interests arise.

Topics in English (ENGL459)

Credits:1

This course focuses on various topics in the areas of language arts and will be offered as needs and interests arise.

Principles of Money Management (FNCE101)

Credits:1

This course introduces students to the keys to financial management. Practical everyday applications are utilized to reinforce concepts of budgeting, checkbook management, cash management, savings, and debt management, as well as investment concept, tax management, and retirement planning. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

Directed Study in History (HIST159)

Credits:1

This course provides the student with the opportunity for directed study of a particular problem or area.

World Civilization I (HIST174)

Credits:3

This course is a study of the development of world civilization with an emphasis on Western civilization and its interaction with non-Western civilizations. It covers the time periods from pre-history to The Age of Discovery. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

World Civilization II (HIST175)

Credits:3

This course is a study of the development of world civilization with an emphasis on Western civilization and its interaction with non-Western civilizations. It covers the time periods from The Age of Discovery to the present. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

U.S. History I (HIST211)

Credits:3

This course is a survey of United States political, diplomatic, social, and cultural history from the period just before European settlement to the Civil War. The course will examine ideas, institutions, movements, and events that shaped United States history. Students will focus on topics such as Colonial America, the American Revolution, Jeffersonian Democracy, Slavery, and the Civil War. (Fall)

U.S. History II (HIST212)

Credits:3

This course is a survey of United States political, diplomatic, social, and cultural history from the Civil War until the present. The course will examine ideas, institutions, movements, and events that shaped United States history. Students will focus on major events such as Reconstruction, industrialization, world wars and conflicts, the Great Depression, and the Civil Rights Movement. Special attention will be placed on the following themes: race, ethnicity, gender, big business, politics, and technological innovation. (Spring)

Philosophy of Healthcare (HMNT103)

Credits:3

Philosophy of Healthcare is an introductory, interdisciplinary course which explores the assumptions underlying a career in healthcare. These assumptions include views on the moral nature of humans, their inherent value, and the ethical issues surrounding illness, suffering, and pain. These topics will be examined through a variety of learning modalities including discussion, readings, journaling, and critical-thinking exercises. Each student will have an Academic Coach that they will meet with outside of the class for a total of 6, 30-minute sessions. These sessions are arranged according to the student's schedule to go over an individualized learning program to help them further absorb and unpack the discussions and topics of the course as well as other classes here on campus. The course will use these learning opportunities to help students develop their critical thinking and communication skills while exploring their own philosophy of healthcare. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

Choir (HMNT105)

Credits:1

Choir is open to all University students through audition, and offers one hour credit each trimester. Regular attendance at performances and rehearsals, including dress rehearsals, is required. May be taken up to 3 times for credit.

Directed Study in Humanities (HMNT159)

Credits:1

This course provides the student with the opportunity for directed study of a particular problem or area.

Literature and Fine Arts (HMNT210)

Credits:3

This course is an interdisciplinary course that surveys literature, painting, and sculpture of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The historical, aesthetic, and philosophical influences of literature and art will be explored through reading and discussing literature, as well as studying art in Orlando art museums. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

Healing Words: The Literature of Healthcare (HMNT325)

Credits:3

This course is a study of literature that encourages examination of the healthcare profession from the perspective of the healthcare provider and the patient. The course is an exploration of literature of medical, ethical, and spiritual issues within cultural and social contexts. Reading and writing assignments and projects include the examination of contemporary issues such as patient care, the prolonging of life, euthanasia, AIDS, and the relationship between the mind and healing. (Fall)

Fitness (HPER123)

Credits:1

This course is a basic fitness training and the development of a lifelong personal conditioning program. The didactic component includes basic information on preparing for and maximizing an exercise program. The activity portion of the course monitors a student's implementation of that program. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

Health and Wellbeing (HPER125)

Credits:2

This course covers both theoretical and experiential components. Topics include the fundamental elements of physical fitness, nutrition, weight control, and stress management. Emphasis will also be given to the practice of personal vision, management, and leadership which contribute to a wholistic paradigm of individual health. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

Women's Fitness (HPER127)

Credits:1

This course focuses on basic fitness training for women, exploring the unique concerns related to self-image, ideal weight, pregnancy, premenstrual syndrome, and menopause. (Fall, Spring)

Directed Study in Physical Education (HPER159)

Credits:1

This course provides the student with the opportunity for directed study of a particular problem or area.

Introduction to Allied Health Careers (HTSC101)

Credits:1

This course is designed to acquaint students with a range of opportunities and careers in allied health and nursing. (Pass, No Pass) (Fall, Spring)

Introduction to Health Sciences Lab and Clinical Skills (HTSC125)

Credits:1

This course provides students with basic understanding and experience in laboratory and clinical techniques. Relevant health sciences lab skills will include liquid concentration calculations, converting between standard and experimental aliquot examples, and centrifugation and autoclaving. A variety of clinical skills will be taught including patient assessment (CPR, histories, vitals, etc.), sterile techniques, and HIPAA. Emphasis throughout this course will be on precision, accuracy, and certifications in essential areas of patient care and health science.

Directed Study in Health Sciences (HTSC159)

Credits:1

This course provides the student with the opportunity for directed study of a particular problem or area.

Performance and Habit Formation (HTSC185)

Credits:1

This seminar will explore the science of performance broadly, covering such topics as goal setting, organization, energy management, willpower, grit, mindset, and habit formation. However, the primary focus will be on habit formation: both the psychology of it as well what habits foster long term academic and professional success.

Seminar in Pre-Professional Studies (HTSC250)

Credits:1

This course focuses on oral and written presentations on careers in healthcare and on student self-assessment.

Topics in Health Sciences (HTSC255)

Credits:1

This course provides various topics in the areas of health sciences and healthcare and will be offered as needs and interests arise.

Consumer Health (HTSC320)

Credits:3

This course introduces students to the role and scope of decision-making involving consumer health. Topics include marketing, analysis, selection, and decision-making regarding healthcare, its products, services, and provider. (Fall)

AIDS/HIV and the Healthcare Provider (HTSC355)

Credits:1

This course is a study of the historical, epidemiological, and public health aspects of HIV/AIDS. Topics include issues related to the socio-economic and health management impact of the disease, health education regarding prevention, and the impact on the healthcare worker. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

Foundations of Health Promotion (HTSC415)

Credits:3

This course will introduce students to the aspects of the interrelationship between the US healthcare system and the community. Topics include the development of the community health movement, the organizations that help shape community health promotion, and the role of epidemiology in the tracking and prevention of injury and disease. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

Introduction to Epidemiology (HTSC440)

Credits:3

This course studies the distribution and determinants of health-related events in human populations. Using a population-based approach, this course will introduce students to practical disease concepts, descriptive and analytic methods of investigation, and establishment of causal relations through hypothesis generation and statistical evaluation. As a fundamental component of preventative medicine and public health, epidemiology aims to improve our understanding of how to improve the health and social conditions of people.(Fall, Spring, Summer)

Topics in Health Sciences (HTSC459)

Credits:1

This course focuses on various topics in the areas of health sciences and healthcare and will be offered as needs and interests arise.

Topics in Health Sciences (HTSC459(2))

Credits:2

Topics in Health Sciences: U.S. Healthcare Systems (HTSC459(3))

Credits:3

Various topics in the areas of health sciences and healthcare will be offered as needs and intersts arise.

Environmental Health (HTSC470)

Credits:3

This course will provide students with a basic understanding of the impact of environmental factors, the health of people, and the community. Topics will include the reaction of the body to environmental pollutants; physical, chemical, and biological agents of environmental contamination; vectors for dissemination; solid and hazardous waste; susceptible populations; biomarkers and risk analysis; the scientific basis for policy decisions; and emerging global environmental health problems. (Spring)

Undergraduate Seminar 1 (HTSC480)

Credits:1

This course focuses on oral and written presentations of current scientific research. Presentations will include topics of interest from referenced journals or original research. Attendance is required. May be repeated for up to four credits. (Pass/No Pass) (Fall, Spring, Summer)

Undergraduate Seminar II (HTSC481)

Credits:1

This course focuses on oral and written presentations of current scientific research. Presentations will include topics of interest from referenced journals or original research. Attendance is required. May be repeated for up to four credits. Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

Undergraduate Research/Practicum I (HTSC490)

Credits:2

This course focuses on directed individual research or independent study, and will be conducted following consultation with a faculty member who will aid the student in designing a research protocol. A written report and oral presentation will determine the course grade. A cumulative GPA of 2.50 and approval by the department chair are required. The course is open only to students with Senior status. Students who have completed an Associate degree with clinical/research component may be exempt from this course. (Pass/No Pass) (Fall, Spring)

Undergraduate Research/Practicum I (HTSC490(3))

Credits:3

Undergraduate Research/Practicum II (HTSC491)

Credits:2

Directed individual research or independent study will be conducted following consultation with a faculty member who will aid the student in designing a research protocol. A written report and oral presentation will determine the course grade. A cumulative GPA of 2.50 and approval by the department chair are required. Course open only to students with Senior status. Students who have completed an Associate degree with clinical/research component may be exempt from this course.(Pass/No Pass)

Cultural and Ethical Considerations in Healthcare (HTSC640)

Credits:3

This course enables students to analyze the basic processes of human association and interaction, including the dynamics of individual, group, and societal issues using critical thinking, ethical, and moral approaches. (Offered by the Department of Health and Biomedical Sciences specifically for ADU graduate students.)

Cultural and Ethical Considerations in Healthcare (HTSC840)

Credits:1

This course enables the students to analyze the basic processes of human association and interaction, including the dynamics of individual, groups, and societal issues using critical thinking, ethical, and moral approaches. Cultural and ethical issues are complex and often appear gray; a clear analysis of these issues allows students to make appropriate decisions and to make professional judgments and at the same time explore their own cultural awareness as well as other diverse cultures and their practices.

Literature Equivalent Satisfied (LITR100EQ)

Credits:3

Introduction to Algebra (MATH091)

Credits:3

This course is designed for those students whose math ACT score is 16 or below, or whose math SAT score is below 470, and who desire to strengthen their math skills before entry into a college-level math course. The course is a study of number systems and their properties; polynomials; rational expressions; exponents; linear equations; and inequalities with applications and graphing. It is designed to prepare students for MATH 105 Intermediate Algebra. Not for College credit. Pass/No Pass (Fall, Spring, Summer)

Survey of Mathematics (MATH103)

Credits:3

This course provides a survey of mathematical topics which include number theory, operations with the real number system, introduction to algebra, introduction to geometry, metric system, consumer math and introduction to statistics. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

Intermediate Algebra (MATH105)

Credits:3

This course provides Math topics which include a review of basic algebra; linear, rational, quadratic, and exponential functions; graphs and functions; factoring, exponents and polynomials; rational expressions and equations; quadratic equations; and inequalities. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

College Algebra (MATH120)

Credits:3

This course focuses on topics that include real and complex numbers; equations and inequalities involving linear and quadratic models; polynomial, greatest integer, absolute value, power, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions and their graphs; real and imaginary zeros of polynomials; solutions of systems of equations and inequalities; and introduction to trigonometric functions. Appropriate support technologies, such as the graphing utility, will be used. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

Pre-Calculus (MATH130)

Credits:3

This course focuses on topics that include equations and inequalities; analysis of exponential, logarithmic, polynomial, rational, power and trigonometric functions and inverses; law of sines and cosines; analytic geometry, trigonometric identities, polar coordinates, and De Moivre's Theorem. Modeling is incorporated in the topics. Appropriate support technologies, such as the graphing utility, will be used. (Fall)

Directed Study (MATH159)

Credits:1

This course provides the student with the opportunity for directed study of a particular concept or subject.

Directed Study (MATH159(3))

Credits:3

Provides the student with the opportunity for directed study of a particular problem or area.

Calculus I with Analytical Geometry (MATH181)

Credits:4

This course is a study of the mathematics of motion and change. Topics include limits, continuity, analytic geometry, and the differential and integral calculus of elementary trigonometric and transcendental functions. Application of the above topics to science, business, engineering, and the other branches of mathematics is explored. (Spring)

Calculus II with Analytical Geometry (MATH182)

Credits:4

This course focuses on topics that include a further study of the calculus of trigonometric functions, especially hyperbolic and inverse functions; applications of integration, including areas, volume, arc length, moments, centers of mass; integration techniques; improper integrals; sequences and series including the Taylor and Macclaurin series; conics; parametric equations; and polar coordinates. (Fall)

Topics in Mathematics (MATH255)

Credits:1

This course focuses on various topics in the areas of mathematics and will be offered as needs and interests arise.

Principles of Marketing (MKTG320)

Credits:3

This marketing course introduces students to the concepts of marketing in today's business environment. Students will acquire an understanding of the marketing process: market analysis, market strategy, implementation and evaluation. This includes market research, identifying target markets, branding, pricing, communication and distribution channels. This course provides a critical examination of the consumer, economy, and technology, as well as ethical and social responsibility.

Principles of Marketing (MRKT320)

Credits:3

This marketing course introduces students to the concepts of marketing in today's business environment. Students will acquire an understanding of the marketing process: market analysis, market strategy, implementation and evaluation. This includes market research, identifying target markets, branding, pricing, communication and distribution channels. This course provides a critical examination of the consumer, economy, and technology, as well as ethical and social responsibility.

Nutrition (NUTR122)

Credits:3

This course provides a study of the digestion, absorption, and metabolism of those nutrients essential for human life, with emphasis on the therapeutic nutrition and dietary changes required for managing certain disease conditions. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

Advanced Pharmacotherapy (PHRM523)

Credits:3

This course increases the student's understanding of fundamental drug actions at the cellular level and their effects on human systems. Principles of pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics, receptor site physiology, toxicology, side effects, indications, and contra-indications are emphasized for each group of drugs. Emphasis is placed on the interaction between pharmacotherapy and pathophysiology.

Survey of Physics (PHYS121)

Credits:4

This course is a series of lectures and laboratory experiences aimed at an understanding of the physical principles of mechanics, heat, sound, light, electricity, and modern physics. The emphasis will be developing a conceptual understanding of the laws of nature through hands-on experiences, laboratory experiments, in addition to lectures and demonstrations. This course satisfies the requirement for various imaging programs, but does not satisfy the requirements for science majors. Lab required. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

General Physics I (PHYS151)

Credits:3

This course is the first trimester of a two-trimester course. The course uses algebra-based mathematics to introduce the study of fundamental concepts that describe the physical work through a series of lectures, hands-on activities, and demonstrations. Topics covered include measurements, kinematics, dynamics, work and energy, rotary motion, and fluids and thermodynamics. This course satisfies the requirement for a major or minor in physics. A lab fee will be assessed. (Fall)

General Physics I Lab (PHYS151L)

Credits:1

This course is a lab that accompanies the first semester of a two-semester course. Lab exercises follow the lecture material covered in PHYS 151 and include experiments in the study of kinematics, dynamics, work and energy, rotary motion and fluids, and thermodynamics. Upon completion, students should be able to apply the laboratory experiences to the concepts presented in the lecture. This course satisfies the requirement for a major or minor in physics. A lab fee will be assessed.(Fall)

General Physics II (PHYS152)

Credits:3

This course is the second trimester of a two-trimester course. The course uses algebra-based mathematics to introduce the study of fundamental concepts that describe the physical work through a series of lectures, hands-on activities, and demonstrations. Topics covered include vibrations and waves, sound, electricity and magnetism, light and optics, and modern physics. This course satisfies the requirement for a major or minor in physics. A lab fee will be assessed. (Spring)

General Physics II Lab (PHYS152L)

Credits:1

This course is a lab that accompanies the second semester of a two-semester course. Lab exercises accompany the lecture material covered in PHYS 152 and include experiments in the study of vibration and waves, sound, electricity and magnetism, light and optics, and modern physics. Upon completion, students should be able to apply the laboratory experiences to the concepts presented in the lecture. This course satisfies the requirement for a major or minor in physics. A lab fee will be assessed. (Spring, Fall)

Directed Study in Physics (PHYS159)

Credits:1

This course provides the student with the opportunity for directed study of a particular problem or area.

General Psychology (PSYC124)

Credits:3

The survey of psychology includes human development, sensation and perception, learning and thinking, emotions, motivation, personality, and stress, as well as psychological disorders and their treatment. The study of psychology is the science that describes and explains how people think, feel, and act. This course will help each individual to understand the significant findings from psychology that apply to human behavior and may lead to a better understanding of ourselves. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

Developmental Psychology (PSYC128)

Credits:3

This course is the study of human life from conception to death. Emphasis is placed on the physical, cognitive, social, and psychological and spiritual development of the individual. Issues are discussed regarding the continuity of human development throughout the life span, how early experiences may affect later development, and the influence of genetics, familial factors, and the environment. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

Directed Study in Psychology (PSYC159)

Credits:1

This course provides the student with the opportunity for directed study of a particular problem or area.

Social Psychology (PSYC245)

Credits:3

This course presents human behavior in its social context to reveal how one's thoughts, feelings, and actions can be influenced by other people. It addresses a wide range of phenomena, including how people form attitudes, how people attempt to persuade and are persuaded by others, how people form close relationships, why people help or harm each other, when people help each other, and how people understand each other and themselves. (Fall, Spring)

Topics in Psychology (PSYC255)

Credits:1

This course provides various topics in the areas of behavioral sciences and will be offered as needs and interests arise.

Health Psychology (PSYC320)

Credits:3

This course is a study of the behavioral aspects of physical health. Topics will include the function of the brain as it affects physical health and wellness. (Fall)

Abnormal Psychology (PSYC420)

Credits:3

This course focuses on the varieties of disordered experiences and conduct which are studied for their contribution to the understanding of more effective personal and social adjustment. Specific topics include the psychosis as well as psychosomatic and conduct disturbances. (Spring)

Topics in Psychology (PSYC459)

Credits:1

This course focuses on various topics in the area of behavioral sciences and will be offered as needs and interests arise.

Topics in Psychology (PSYC459(3))

Credits:3

Various topics in the area of behavioral sciences will be offered as needs and interests arise.

Psychosocial Aspects of Healthcare (PSYC701)

Credits:1

This course examines emotional reactions to disability, psychosocial aspects of disability as they relate to patient-physical therapist interaction; specific problems of the angry, non-compliant, or chronic pain patient; complementary roles of other health professionals; cultural competence applied to one’s own professional behavior and in patient treatment; importance of holistic healthcare.

Introduction to the Bible (RELB103)

Credits:3

This course is a survey of the books of the Bible, combined with the reading of selected passages. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

Jesus and Contemporary Society (RELB125)

Credits:3

This course is an exploration of the life and teachings of Jesus Christ with special attention given to their application to personal, social, and religious issues encountered in contemporary society. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

Directed Study (RELB159)

Credits:1

This course provides the student with the opportunity for directed study of a particular problem or area.

Women of the Bible (RELB215)

Credits:2

This course is a study of the women of the Bible in light of their culture and times, with attention to their achievement, character, and relevance for today. (Spring)

Topics in Religion (RELB225)

Credits:1

This course provides various topics in the areas of religion and ethics and will be offered as needs and interests arise.

Wisdom of the Bible (RELB305)

Credits:2

Drawing on the Old Testament books of Job, Proverbs, and Ecclesiastes, this course examines biblical principles relevant to living a spiritual life. (Fall, Spring)

Lessons on Living: Biblical Perspectives (RELB379)

Credits:3

This course focuses on biblical wisdom books, including, the Sermon on the Mount, and the Parables of Jesus. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

Topics in Religion (RELB459)

Credits:1

This course covers various topics in the areas of religion, theology, and ethics and will be offered as needs and interest arise.

Topics in Religion (RELB459(3))

Credits:3

Various topics in the areas of religion, theology, and ethics will be offered as needs and interest arise.

Introduction to Christian Ethics (RELE205)

Credits:2

This course helps the student lay a foundation in moral decision-making in the fields of personal, moral, and biomedical ethics. Topics and discussions are explored from a biblical perspective. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

Ethics for Nursing and Allied Health (RELE305)

Credits:3

This course is a survey of ethical issues facing the allied healthcare professional from a Christian perspective. Topics include confidentiality, conflict of interest, autonomy, culturally-appropriate health practice, reproductive issues, end-of-life care, and issues in the allocation of healthcare. The student will have the opportunity to draw upon clinical practice.

Christian Ethics and Healthcare (RELE405)

Credits:3

This course is an advanced analysis of ethical issues and options in healthcare, including cloning, euthanasia, and abortion. Topics are selected in part by student priorities. A discussion of the unique role of Christian ethical beliefs in the mission of Florida Hospital will be examined. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

Philosophy of Healthcare (RELP102)

Credits:2

This course is an introductory, interdisciplinary course which explores the assumptions underlying a career in healthcare. These assumptions include views on the moral nature of humans, their inherent value, and the ethical issues surrounding illness, suffering, and pain. These topics will be examined through a variety of learning modalities, including discussion, readings, journaling, and critical-thinking exercises. Each student will have an Academic Coach that he or she will meet with outside of the class for a total of six 30-minute sessions. These sessions are arranged according to each student's schedule. The course will provide opportunities to help students develop their critical thinking and communication skills while exploring their own philosophy of healthcare. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

Philosophy of Healthcare (RELP103)

Credits:3

This course is as an introductory, interdisciplinary course which explores the assumptions underlying a career in healthcare. These assumptions include views on the moral nature of humans, their inherent value, and the ethical issues surrounding illness, suffering, and pain. These topics will be examined through a variety of learning modalities including discussion, readings, journaling, and critical-thinking exercises. Each student will have an Academic Coach that he or she will meet with outside of the class for a total of six 30-minute sessions. These sessions are arranged according to each student's schedule. The course will provide opportunities to help students develop their critical thinking and communication skills while exploring their own philosophy of healthcare. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

Issues in Grieving and Loss (RELP142)

Credits:2

This course is an examination of the grief process from the perspectives of the patient, the family, and the healthcare provider. Students will also explore the meaning of grief and death in various cultures and religions. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

Introduction to Spiritual Disciplines (RELP245)

Credits:1

This course is an exploration and experiential application of the spiritual growth of the student. Models for care of the spiritual life are examined, and the potential for deepening one's relationship with God is addressed. Topics include meditation, silence, solitude, spiritual gifts, study of scripture, and prayer. (Spring, Summer)

Spiritual Dimensions of Healthcare (RELP374)

Credits:3

This course explores the interrelationship between spirituality and healthcare delivery. Topics include identification and assessment of spirituality, the relationship between spirituality and the mind and body, spiritual development across the life span, spiritual caregiving, spiritual interventions, and diverse religious/spiritual perspectives on wellness and illness. (Spring)

Spirituality, Health, and Wholeness (RELP510)

Credits:3

This is a seminar course which explores the interrelationship between spirituality and healthcare delivery. Emphasis is placed upon real-life experiences and contextual influences of specialty healthcare practice. Topics may include: identification and assessment of spirituality, the relationship between spirituality and the mind and body, spiritual development across the life spam, spiritual care giving, spiritual self-care, spiritual interventions, and diverse religious/spiritual perspectives on wellness and illness.

Role Fidelity and the Exercise of Power (RELP610)

Credits:1

This course places emphasis on the biblical perspective of servant leadership in the use of authority. Issues pursued include the recognition of boundaries in personal relations within the workplace and balancing role fidelity with personal integrity.

Identity and Mission Experience (RELP800)

Credits:1

This course offers a service-learning experience outside of the United States where personal and professional identity and mission are challenged by exposure to different cultures, resources, and experiences, encouraging growth and awareness of the needs of the international community. This course culminates in a physical therapy needs assessment integrating findings from this experience or other product agreed upon between faculty and student through a learning contract.

Role Fidelity and the Exercise of Power (RELP810)

Credits:1

This course places emphasis on the biblical perspective of servant leadership in the use of authority. Issues include the recognition of boundaries in personal relations within the workplace and balancing role fidelity with personal integrity. This course includes the completion of volunteer service/participation hours in three settings: professional community, community service, and the Hope Clinic. The service-learning experience in the Hope Clinic is under the direction of faculty clinicians.

Seventh-day Adventist Beliefs and Practices (RELT150)

Credits:1

This course conveys the basic commitments, beliefs, and practices of Seventh-day Adventists. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

Foundations of Religious Thought (RELT250)

Credits:2

This course involves a critical-thinking approach to the study of religion. It explores the interplay between philosophy, psychology, science, and various aspects of the religious phenomenon. The evidence for religion as an integral part of human experience will be studied. (Fall, Spring)

World Religions for the Healthcare Professions (RELT368)

Credits:3

This course is a study of the major world religions, including their history and development. The course will also familiarize the student with the major tenets and practices of these religions in the context of the healthcare professions. Available as a Baccalaureate degree course. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

Identity and Mission in Faith-Based Healthcare (RELT510)

Credits:2

This course addresses the mission and practices of faith-based healthcare. A wide range of assignments and readings, biblical and elsewhere, provide the health care provider in training with a broader understanding of the spiritual dimensions of healthcare. Topics include human identity as “the image of God” and “child of God”, spirituality across faith traditions, compassionate whole person care, and aspects of bioethics related to human dignity, autonomy and beneficence.

Identity and Mission in Faith-Based Healthcare (RELT710)

Credits:2

This course explores the relationship between spirituality and healthcare delivery. Emphasis is placed on viewing the patient and the caregiver from the perspective of persons made in the image of God and as children of God. Students will implement sustainable practices to maintain personal well-being based on CREATION Health. Students will integrate experiential knowledge in spiritual care giving, including active listening and presence. Topics may include: diverse religious perspectives on wellness, illness, and suffering, the relationship between spirituality and the mind and body, the role of faith-based healthcare, and select bioethical issues involving whole patient care. Additional requirements for those students in the RELT 710 course include the identification, selection, and submission of opportunities for completion of the required experiences for RELP 800 and RELP 810. Resources required to complete each must be identified and submitted.

Issues in Science and Religion (REPH475)

Credits:3

This course is designed to help students develop an understanding of the issues raised by the interaction between modern science and present-day Christian thought. A brief historical overview of the conflict between science and religion is followed by an assessment of the contemporary state of this dialogue in such areas as cosmology and the origins of the universe, origins of life, the theory of Darwinian evolution, and the design argument. (Fall, Spring)

Research and Evidence-Based Practice (RSCH512)

Credits:3

This course is designed to give students an overview of quantitative and qualitative research processes. Students explore principles of research design, measurement, data collection, sampling, and data analysis through critical examination of published studies. Principles of evidence-based practice are incorporated in order to assess the state of the science and direct decision-making in specialty healthcare practice.

Service-Learning (SERV101)

Credits:1

This course will provide the student with an understanding of service-learning and its connection with the mission of the University. The course will provide the student with the opportunity to participate in service-learning projects relevant to their personal and professional goals. This course will offer the student the opportunity to achieve a minimum of 14 service-learning hours. These hours will help fulfill the graduation requirements for service-learning. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

Service-Learning (SERV102)

Credits:2

This course will provide the student with an understanding of service-learning and its connection with the mission of the University. The course will provide the student with the opportunity to participate in service-learning projects relevant to their personal and professional goals. This course will offer the student the opportunity to achieve a minimum of 21 service-learning hours. These hours will help fulfill the graduation requirements for service-learning. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

Introduction to Sociology (SOCI125)

Credits:3

This course enables students to understand the basic processes of human association and interaction, including the dynamics of groups, social roles, communication, and mass behavior. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

Directed Study in Sociology (SOCI159)

Credits:1

This course provides the student with the opportunity for directed study of a particular problem or area.

Multicultural Applications for the Health Sciences (SOCI301)

Credits:3

This course enables students to develop an understanding of sociocultural and linguistic factors within the healthcare facility and ultimately the wider community. Students will explore issues relating to multiculturalism such as language, race, gender, age, ethnicity, social class, religion, physical and mental abilities, and other issues of diversity. They will explore how diversity impacts the relationship and the effectiveness of the care provider and the patient/client. Students will be able to construct their own perspective of diversity within the healthcare facility and the broader community. (Spring)

Aging and Society (SOCI349)

Credits:3

This course explores the relationship between attitudes within society and the elderly. It examines the increasing influence of senior citizens upon the norms, politics, economics, and demographics of society. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

Topics in Sociology (SOCI459)

Credits:1

This course focuses on various topics in the area of sociology and will be offered as needs and interest arise.

Spanish for the Healthcare Worker (SPAN101)

Credits:3

This course teaches basic communication skills for conversing with Spanish-speaking patients in the healthcare setting. The student learns basic grammatical structure and vocabulary as well as specific medical terminology. (Fall, Summer)

Spanish for the Healthcare Worker (SPAN105)

Credits:3

This course teaches basic communication skills for conversing with Spanish-speaking patients in the healthcare setting. The student learns basic grammatical structure and vocabulary as well as specific medical terminology. (Fall, Summer)

Introduction to Public Speaking (SPCH145)

Credits:3

This course emphasizes the preparation and presentation of informative and persuasive speeches, including methods of securing interest, persuasion, and delivery. The course meets the requirement for an oral communication course (see the communication requirements section in the Academic Catalog). (Fall, Spring, Summer)

Introduction to Applied Statistics (STAT205)

Credits:3

This course is an introduction to statistics and its applications, and is designed to prepare students to interpret and evaluate statistics and statistical methods used in published research papers and to make decisions about the appropriateness of specific statistical methods in a variety of settings. Areas of emphasis will include descriptive statistics; analysis of graphs; sampling methods; z, t; confidence intervals; and hypothesis testing. This course will not fulfill the pre-requisite requirements for graduate degrees. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

Elementary Statistics (STAT215)

Credits:3

This course is an introduction to descriptive and inferential statistics, normal distribution, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, correlation, and regression. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

Scientific Inquiry and Research (STAT515)

Credits:3

This course is a review of research designs and scientific methods of research, including concepts of validity, reliability, and standardization leading to the systematic evaluation and application of evidence-based research. The course covers qualitative and quantitative data analyses including one-sample, correlation and regression, analysis of variance and covariance, factorial and multivariate, and nonparametric methodologies relevant to healthcare. The utilization of scientific evidence through scholarly inquiry to improve business, as well as clinical processes and ultimately patient outcome, is emphasized.